Premier Realty Group, Inc



Posted by Premier Realty Group, Inc on 6/10/2018

There are a lot of ways a real estate agent can help you find the best home for your needs. However, the final decision always rests squarely on your shoulders.

The challenge for many home buyers -- especially first-timers -- is to keep everything in perspective and avoid sacrificing features that are especially important to you.

Developing a carefully thought-out priority list, consisting of both necessities and "wish list" items, is an essential starting point for getting what you want in a new home. Even though house hunting can potentially wear you down, it's important to hang in there and stay true to your priorities.

While everyone has different expectations, lifestyle needs, and personal requirements, some things are bound to create issues down the road.

  • Being too close to neighbors: Depending on your need for privacy, this may or may not be a problem for you. However, if you don't want your life to feel like a reality show (with your neighbors being the audience), then it would probably pay to maintain a comfortable distance between houses. Unfortunately, that's not always possible. For example, if you're in the market for a home in an urban environment or a townhouse setting, then close proximity "comes with the territory". If living in suburbia is your objective, though, it's often feasible and desirable to keep some breathing room between neighbors.
  • Basement laundry: Having to go up and down an extra flight of stairs every time you do your laundry is not the worst thing in the world, but it can make laundry day more of a hassle. The inconvenience of a basement laundry is multiplied if you have to do several loads of laundry every week. To make that chore even more unpleasant, unfinished basements are often dank, musty smelling, and not much to look at! Regardless of the condition of the basement, though, having a first-floor laundry does make life a lot easier!
  • A tiny yard: A spacious yard is not a feature all house hunters require, but if you have dogs, kids, and the occasional backyard barbecue, then you'd probably find a good-sized yard to be more satisfying. On the other hand, if your short-term plan includes moving in a few years, then yard size might not be a major issue.
  • Being too far from conveniences: Do you have your heart set on a rural setting for your next home? If so, you may have to sacrifice being close to shopping, entertainment, friends, and work. It is a potential trade-off that you and your family will need to consider carefully. Reaching a consensus on what you must have versus what you'd like to have in a home will hopefully help ensure a decision you'll all be satisfied with.
There are literally dozens of other potential priorities to consider when searching for a new home, so it's wise to create a comprehensive list of the features, advantages, and amenities that are really important to you. Your real estate agent can work with you to pinpoint your house hunting requirements and help you find the house of your dreams... or at least a close facsimile!





Posted by Premier Realty Group, Inc on 11/12/2017

An open house allows a homebuyer to explore a residence. And ultimately, this event may help a homebuyer determine whether to submit an offer on a home. For homebuyers, there are many terrific reasons to attend an open house, including: 1. You Can Learn About a Home from a Home Seller's Real Estate Agent. Although you may spend time reviewing home listings online, there may be information about a house that is unavailable on the web. Fortunately, an open house enables you to speak directly to a home seller's real estate agent and find out more information about a residence. From learning whether a home seller is motivated to sell quickly to finding out which internet services providers are available in the area, a home seller's real estate agent should be able to answer any questions you may have during an open house. As a result, you can receive plenty of insights that can help you make an informed decision about whether a particular residence is right for you. 2. You Can Check Out the Overall Condition of the Home. Online photos sometimes can be deceiving, but an open house allows you to get an up-close look at a residence and find out if it fulfills your personal needs. For instance, an open house will enable you to check out the size of each room as well as the overall condition of the home's exterior and interior. Plus, you may be able to review the performance of a home's air conditioning and heating systems and find out if these units will need to be repaired or replaced in the near future. Perhaps best of all, an open house gives you the chance to envision what life could be like if you bought a residence. Because you can walk around the home and explore it at your leisure during an open house, this event provides you with the freedom to evaluate a residence in a pressure-free situation. 3. You Can Find Out if There Is Significant Interest in a Home. Typically, a home seller's real estate agent will set up a sign-in sheet for attendees who visit an open house. This sheet enables a home seller to see how many people attended an open house and may provide you with a good indication about whether there is substantial interest in a residence. It is important to remember that the housing market is competitive, regardless of whether you're searching for a residence in a buyers' or sellers' market. As such, if an open house is filled with people, there likely is significant interest in a house. And if only a few people attend the event, there may be a greater chance that a home seller would accept an offer below his or her initial asking price. Ask your real estate agent for information about open houses in your area Ė you'll be glad you did! This real estate professional will be able to keep you up to date about open houses and help you find your dream home quickly and efficiently.





Posted by Premier Realty Group, Inc on 5/10/2015

Thereís a lot to consider when youíre buying a home and itís easy to become overwhelmed with all the possibilities. Itís also easy to fall in love with a house simply because itís furnished tastefully, smells nice or has a beautiful front lawn. Be sure to look past the cosmetics of the house and keep the most important things in mind when you go house shopping. Donít ignore a house just because you donít like the color of the paint or wallpaper, because those are cosmetic things that can be changed to your liking. There are a few key features that are the most important things to consider when buying a house, outside of finances. Space Before looking at houses, decide how many bedrooms and bathrooms you absolutely must have for the size of your family. Then, consider if you really need a living room and a family room. Some people buy a house with both, and never even use the living room, making it an unnecessary waste of space. Do you work from home and need an office? Do you have young children who need a big yard to play in? Do you like to entertain and want an adult play room in a basement? Do you want to grow into the house and take future children into consideration, or will a large home just be too much? These are all things to consider before deciding how much home you really need. Commute Your commute is important and may be more important than you realize. Many people have made the mistake of buying a home too far from work and underestimating the toll a long commute will have on their lives. A long commute cuts down on your family and social life, increases stress, and may even cause you to lose sleep. Often it is better to find a home close to work and perhaps give up something you think is important in a home. This is all about keeping your priorities straight. Is Your Furniture Going to Fit If you have large furniture, or a lot of furniture, consider if it will all fit in your new home. Will that large over-sized dresser be able to be carried up three flights of stairs into your bedroom? Will your expensive, overstuffed sofa fit in the front door of an older home? Will the bedroom be big enough for your king-sized bed or will it take up the whole room? If you have a dining room now, does the new house have one also, or is that something you can forgo?







Tags